The Capital of the United States of America was in MoCo on This Day in 1814

BROOKEVILLE, MD - OCTOBER 10: Contest winners Sandra and Duane Heiler and their historic home on October, 10, 2012 in Brookeville, MD. Pictured, an exterior view of the house. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

The Capital of the United States of America was in MoCo on This Day in 1814

Brookeville was settled by Quakers late in the 18th century and was formally incorporated as a town in 1808. Just six years later, it became the “U.S. Capital for a Day.”

On August 24, 1814 (during the War of 1812), after defeating the Americans at the Battle of Bladensburg, the British set fire to Washington City (now Washington D.C.) including multiple government buildings like the White House (then called the Presidential Mansion) and the Capitol building.

President James Madison, along with U.S. military officials and members of the government, fled D.C. and found refuge in Brookeville. Madison spent the night at the home of Caleb Bentley, whose home still stands in Brookeville today and is known as the Madison House.

Featured photo courtesy of the Maryland Archives.

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